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The UNMET Need

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BURNS ARE ONE OF THE MOST DEVASTATING OF ALL INJURIES
AND A MAJOR GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH CONCERN.

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The Power of Perspective

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WE ARE NOT PREPARED FOR A BURN CATASTROPHE


  • The current supply of burn tissue is based on historical demand; supply of cadaver allograft is limited by its very nature.

  • The ever growing threat of domestic terrorism must be considered. We are unprepared for a mass casualty chemical or incendiary attack.

  • The American Burn Association (ABA) has defined a mass burn casualty disaster as any catastrophic event in which the number of burn victims exceeds the capacity of the local burn center to provide optimal burn care.


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Burn Statistics

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EACH YEAR IN AMERICA:


  • Burns are a leading cause of accidental injury and death in the United States1

  • 486,000 victims suffer burn injuries annually; 40,000 such cases require hospitalization.2

  • ™Over 120,000 children receive care in emergency departments each year for burn-related injuries.3

  • Scalding is the most common injury for children under 4 years old.4
  • ™
  • Up to 20% of service members injured in combat experience severe burns,
    in large part due to the increased use of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).5
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A Global Concern

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GLOBALLY, THOUSANDS GO WITHOUT PROPER CARE


  • Burns are responsible for an estimated 265,000 deaths worldwide annually.6

  • ™The world's most vulnerable populations, women, children, and the poor, are at the highest risk for burn injury.7

  • Globally, burns are among the leading causes of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost in low and middle-income countries.8

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Join Us

"We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things,
not because they are easy...but because they are hard." – JFK


Join Us.



XENO-SKIN IS READY NOW TO SAVE COUNTLESS LIVES WORLDWIDE


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References

1 Bloemsma GC, Dokter J, Boxma H, Oen IM. Mortality and causes in a burn center. Burns 2008; 34(8):1103
2 American Burn Association. Burn Incidence and Treatment in the United States: 2016. Resources. Accessed March 2016. http://www.ameriburn.org/resources_factsheet.ph
3 American Burn Association. Burn Incidence and Treatment in the United States: 2016. Resources. Accessed March 2016. http://www.ameriburn.org/resources_factsheet.ph
4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Burns Safety: The Reality. National Center for Injury Preventions and Control. Updated April 2012. www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html and D’Souza AL, Nelson NG, McKenzie LB. Pediatric burn injuries treated in US emergency departments between 1990 and 2006. Pediatrics 2009; 124:1424.
5 Kauvar DS, Wolf SE, Wade CE, et al. Burns sustained in combat explosions in Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF explosion burns). Burns 2006; 32:853; Wolf SE, Kauvar DS, Wade CE, et al. Comparison between civilian burns and combat burns from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Ann Surg 2006; 243:786; Cancio LC, Horvath EE, Barillo DJ, et al. Burn support for Operation Iraqi Freedom and related operations, 2003 to 2004. J Burn Care Rehabil 2005; 26:151.
6 World Health Organization. Burns Fact Sheet. WHO Media Center. Updated April 2014. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs365/en/
7 Ibid.
8 Ibid.